Category Archives: Education

‘We will keep your secrets’, China promises foreign companies with new law

Chinese officials will be obliged to protect commercially confidential information they obtain from overseas businesses, according to the latest draft of China’s new foreign investment law, Trend reports referring to South China Morning Post.

Delegates to the National People’s Congress in Beijing were presented with the new version on Tuesday, after last week’s version received a lukewarm response from foreign businesses and academics in China.

Provisions have been added to the legislation which make clear that Chinese government employees must keep secret any confidential commercial information from foreign firms and must not leak or give to others illegally.

The law, which is due to come into effect on January 1, 2020, will make it illegal for officials to misuse critical information or to provide it to local Chinese firms, on pain of administrative or even criminal punishment.

Beijing is also promising a level playing field for investors with the new law, in an effort to reassure the global investment community as China’s attractiveness as an investment destination wanes amid rising costs at home and growing hostilities abroad.

The foreign investment law stipulates clearly that China will give equal treatment to foreign firms in government procurement of not only products, but also services. The earlier draft only mentioned products.

The legislation is also seen as Beijing’s answer to growing complaints from Washington that China is forcing foreign investors to transfer technologies to local partners or stealing technologies from US firms � a complaint underlying Washington’s decision to start a tariff war against China. The Chinese government has denied these allegations.

China’s lawmakers have reassured investors from Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan that their investment in China will not be hindered or restricted by the new legislation, even though they are not specifically mentioned in the text.

A statement issued by the NPC’s law committee on Tuesday said it was appropriate and feasible that the foreign investment law contains no specific clauses over its applicability to Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan investors.

This, it said, was because existing State Council rules and regulations would continue to apply and the law would not affect or change institutional arrangements or actual operations that have proved effective for many years, nor generate any hindrance or restriction over investments from Hong Kong, Macau or Taiwan.

The new law replaces the three foreign capital laws � the Law on Sino-Foreign Equity Joint Ventures, the Law on Sino-Foreign Contractual Joint Ventures and the Law on Foreign-Capital Enterprises � and is expected to be officially endorsed by the largely ceremonial legislative session later this week.

Source: TREND News Agency

Tibet Supporters Mark 60th Anniversary of Failed Uprising Against China

Sunday marks the 60th anniversary of Tibet’s failed uprising against China.

The abortive mission forced the Dalai Lama, Tibet’s traditional Buddhist leader, into exile in mountainous Dharamsala, in India, where he established a Tibetan government-in-exile.

He launched his campaign for a free Tibet from Dharamsala. His efforts earned him worldwide respect and fame as an adherent of non-violence.

He won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989.

The 83-year-old Dalai Lama continues to live in Dharamsala.

Devotees at the Dalai Lama’s temple in Dharamsala observed the anniversary Sunday with chants and prayers. Some had painted “Free Tibet” on their faces.

A photo exhibit entitled “60 Years of Tibetan Resistance” is on display at the Tibet museum in Dharamsala.

A march, marking the anniversary, was planned in New Delhi, India’s capital.

Under Chinese rule, critics say Tibet’s unique cultural heritage and language are slowly fading away.

China insists that Tibet has been under Chinese rule for centuries, but Tibetans insist they were essentially independent for most of that time.

An editorial in China’s official Xinhua News Agency said Saturday that under China’s rule Tibet has experienced economic growth, increased lifespans and improved education.

Xinhua said “Sixty years since the epoch-making democratic reform in Tibet, people… have enjoyed unprecedented human rights in history.”

Tibet monitoring groups, however, disagree with that assessment.

The International Tibet Network said in a statement that “China has ridden roughshod over the human and political rights of citizens under its rule for far too long.” It added: “With resistance by the Tibetan people so strong and vibrant, it’s time for a response from the international community that matches their courage and conviction.”

Source: Voice of America

Tibet Supporters Mark 60th Anniversary of Failed Uprising Against China

Sunday marks the 60th anniversary of Tibet’s failed uprising against China.

The abortive mission forced the Dalai Lama, Tibet’s traditional Buddhist leader, into exile in mountainous Dharamsala, in India, where he established a Tibetan government-in-exile.

He launched his campaign for a free Tibet from Dharamsala. His efforts earned him worldwide respect and fame as an adherent of non-violence.

He won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989.

The 83-year-old Dalai Lama continues to live in Dharamsala.

Devotees at the Dalai Lama’s temple in Dharamsala observed the anniversary Sunday with chants and prayers. Some had painted “Free Tibet” on their faces.

A photo exhibit entitled “60 Years of Tibetan Resistance” is on display at the Tibet museum in Dharamsala.

A march, marking the anniversary, was planned in New Delhi, India’s capital.

Under Chinese rule, critics say Tibet’s unique cultural heritage and language are slowly fading away.

China insists that Tibet has been under Chinese rule for centuries, but Tibetans insist they were essentially independent for most of that time.

An editorial in China’s official Xinhua News Agency said Saturday that under China’s rule Tibet has experienced economic growth, increased lifespans and improved education.

Xinhua said “Sixty years since the epoch-making democratic reform in Tibet, people… have enjoyed unprecedented human rights in history.”

Tibet monitoring groups, however, disagree with that assessment.

The International Tibet Network said in a statement that “China has ridden roughshod over the human and political rights of citizens under its rule for far too long.” It added: “With resistance by the Tibetan people so strong and vibrant, it’s time for a response from the international community that matches their courage and conviction.”

Source: Voice of America

5 Years on, Malaysia Open to Proposals to Resume MH370 Hunt

KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA Malaysia’s transport minister said Sunday that the government is open to new proposals from U.S. technology firm Ocean Infinity or any other companies to resume the hunt for Flight 370, as families of passengers marked the fifth anniversary of the jet’s mysterious disappearance.

Ocean Infinity mounted a “no cure, no fee” search for the plane in the southern Indian Ocean in January 2018 that ended in May without any clue on where it could have crashed. But the company’s CEO, Oliver Plunkett, said in a video shown at the public remembrance event at a mall near Kuala Lumpur that the company hopes to resume the hunt with better technology it obtained in the past year.

The Ocean Infinity mission came a year after an official search by Malaysia, Australia and China ended in futility.

Plunkett said his company has better technology now after successfully locating an Argentinian submarine in November, a year after it went missing. He said the firm is still reviewing all possible data on Flight 370 and thinking about how it can revive its failed mission.

“We haven’t given up hope. … We hope we can continue the search in due course,” Plunkett said.

Transport Minister Anthony Loke said it’s been frustrating that the two searches failed to produce any clues and that he “welcomes credible leads and also concrete proposals to resume the search.”

He told reporters later Sunday that the government is “waiting for specific proposals, in particular from Ocean Infinity.” He brushed off suggestions of offering rewards to find the plane, but said the government is willing to discuss proposals from any companies prepared to resume the search.

“There must be a proposal from a specific company … we cannot just be out there without credible leads. That’s the most practical thing to do,” Loke said. The plane vanished with 239 people on board on March 8, 2014, while flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. Confirmed debris that washed ashore in the western Indian Ocean helped narrow the search area where Ocean Infinity focused, but it failed to uncover any evidence.

A Malaysian-led independent investigation report released last July showed lapses in the government’s response and raised the possibility of “intervention by a third party.”

Investigators, however, said thecause of the disappearance cannot be determined until the wreckage and the plane’s black boxes are found. The report reiterated Malaysia’s assertion that the plane was deliberately diverted and flown for over seven hours after severing communications.

But it said there was no evidence of abnormal behavior or stress in the two pilots that could lead them to hijack the plane. All the other passengers were also cleared by police and had no pilot training.

Voice 370, a support group for next-of-kin, expressed hope that the new government that won a general election in May last year will do more to encourage search missions and seek new clues.

The group’s spokeswoman, Grace Nathan, urged the government to set aside up to $70 million – the amount it agreed to pay Ocean Infinity had it found the plane – to encourage exploration companies to take on “no cure, no fee” missions so that Flight 370’s passengers will not have died in vain.

“It is a wound that cannot heal” if there is no closure, Nathan said.

Another family member, K.S. Narendran from India, said the burden is on the government to be proactive and not wait for credible evidence to fall on its lap. He said there has been no government effort to find more debris on African beaches and Indian Ocean islands, where scattered pieces of the Boeing 777 have been found.

During the remembrance event, family members lit candles and sang songs in tribute to their loved ones. Relatives and supporters wore light blue T-shirts that read, “It’s not history, it’s the future. Fly safely,” as they reminded the government that the mystery must be solved to ensure aviation safety.

Source: Voice of America

5 Years on, Malaysia Open to Proposals to Resume MH370 Hunt

KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA Malaysia’s transport minister said Sunday that the government is open to new proposals from U.S. technology firm Ocean Infinity or any other companies to resume the hunt for Flight 370, as families of passengers marked the fifth anniversary of the jet’s mysterious disappearance.

Ocean Infinity mounted a “no cure, no fee” search for the plane in the southern Indian Ocean in January 2018 that ended in May without any clue on where it could have crashed. But the company’s CEO, Oliver Plunkett, said in a video shown at the public remembrance event at a mall near Kuala Lumpur that the company hopes to resume the hunt with better technology it obtained in the past year.

The Ocean Infinity mission came a year after an official search by Malaysia, Australia and China ended in futility.

Plunkett said his company has better technology now after successfully locating an Argentinian submarine in November, a year after it went missing. He said the firm is still reviewing all possible data on Flight 370 and thinking about how it can revive its failed mission.

“We haven’t given up hope. … We hope we can continue the search in due course,” Plunkett said.

Transport Minister Anthony Loke said it’s been frustrating that the two searches failed to produce any clues and that he “welcomes credible leads and also concrete proposals to resume the search.”

He told reporters later Sunday that the government is “waiting for specific proposals, in particular from Ocean Infinity.” He brushed off suggestions of offering rewards to find the plane, but said the government is willing to discuss proposals from any companies prepared to resume the search.

“There must be a proposal from a specific company … we cannot just be out there without credible leads. That’s the most practical thing to do,” Loke said. The plane vanished with 239 people on board on March 8, 2014, while flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. Confirmed debris that washed ashore in the western Indian Ocean helped narrow the search area where Ocean Infinity focused, but it failed to uncover any evidence.

A Malaysian-led independent investigation report released last July showed lapses in the government’s response and raised the possibility of “intervention by a third party.”

Investigators, however, said thecause of the disappearance cannot be determined until the wreckage and the plane’s black boxes are found. The report reiterated Malaysia’s assertion that the plane was deliberately diverted and flown for over seven hours after severing communications.

But it said there was no evidence of abnormal behavior or stress in the two pilots that could lead them to hijack the plane. All the other passengers were also cleared by police and had no pilot training.

Voice 370, a support group for next-of-kin, expressed hope that the new government that won a general election in May last year will do more to encourage search missions and seek new clues.

The group’s spokeswoman, Grace Nathan, urged the government to set aside up to $70 million – the amount it agreed to pay Ocean Infinity had it found the plane – to encourage exploration companies to take on “no cure, no fee” missions so that Flight 370’s passengers will not have died in vain.

“It is a wound that cannot heal” if there is no closure, Nathan said.

Another family member, K.S. Narendran from India, said the burden is on the government to be proactive and not wait for credible evidence to fall on its lap. He said there has been no government effort to find more debris on African beaches and Indian Ocean islands, where scattered pieces of the Boeing 777 have been found.

During the remembrance event, family members lit candles and sang songs in tribute to their loved ones. Relatives and supporters wore light blue T-shirts that read, “It’s not history, it’s the future. Fly safely,” as they reminded the government that the mystery must be solved to ensure aviation safety.

Source: Voice of America